I LMAO too! #3

Canada Immigration Forum (discussion group)


 
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Subject: I LMAO too! #3
  back in 2002,CIC changed the rules for qualification because it was not working very well. All hell broke loose because people wanted the chance to come anyway - regardless of whether it was beneficial or not.

In the past 5 years, how many new Canadians have actually arrived under the new criteria? Don´t forget, only half of Canada´s immigration population are coming as Skilled workers. In many cases, the sad stories we are hearing are from people who came under the old system. If we change the rules again - all of you will be allowed to finish your applications under the 67 point criteria. Would you be happy if Canada changes to the Austrailian system now that you are 2 years into the process and the changes apply to YOUR application? Even if it saves you some long term grief??? Didn´t think so. By the time new applicants land, the economy could be in the tank and the job market totally redirected. How should we deal with this?

The only option I can see is the US system. Come and work here but as soon as we don´t need you - go home! Not nice to my way of thinking. It is modern day slavery.

Raj, you made a comment that carpenters are not ´educated´ or something similar. That is a misnomer. Skilled trades people often have as much schooling as a 4 year bachelor degree - and ironically - 100% of the courses are relevant to their profession rather than a percentage.

You also mentioned that people at the age of 40 are not interested in changing careers. I could not disagree with you more! People of 25 have no idea what is out there in terms of opportunites. They also have no true idea of what interests them or satisfies them professionally. 40 is a very common age for Canadians to rethink their employment. So is 50! The industry I am in currently has no remote association to what I did in my early 20´s. I have every intention of looking around me in the next several years to make another change. Why would I want to do the same thing for my entire life???

There is no doubt that Canada needs to find a better solution to our skilled labour shortage. It also needs to do a better job of making the opportunities clear to prospective immigrants.

[31-10-2007,16:24]
[***.20.127.20]
sharon
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
Sharon,
I did not mean carpenters are not educated, I am not sure where did you pick that from, in any case I apologise if others felt that I am implying the same.

You can think of changing careers because if it does not work out, you can fall back to what you have been doing, you will not starve to death or will not deplete all your life savings. Moreover, being single is a luxury if you want to change careers, just try to find out how many families with single income have experimented with changing careers in the mid 50´s. Is that the norm ? I think the bottomline is your financial situation, just because I can afford to change my career does not mean that I should be forced to do it. And its not right to assume its real easy for everyone just beacuse you can do it. Also Sharon, as you mentioned anything that will avoid long term grief.... I´ll take it. The reason you are seeing the influx of so many immigrants is simple, Canada is the easiest place to immigrate.... you just need 67 points, its a cake walk for most applicants.

Canada is cashing out on others life savings, its not easy to digest I´m sure, but trying to justify it does not make sense either.
I don´t think you know much about US Immigration Sharon, there is a work permit, just like Canada has, where they can ask you to return if you are not wanted, I am totally okay with that, why not ? but when you apply for immigration its a little different, the US cannot force you out, I agree the wait is long, but the future immigrant has enough resources to get employed and still prove his worth because of the opportunities. And it is that specific rule driven by job market why you see more IT guys immigrating than carpenters with highly educated degrees, beacuse education has nothing to do with it.

[31-10-2007,17:03]
[***.242.242.2]
Raj
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
Sharon,

As far as I know once event the immigration law changes; the applicants who already have applied are always eveluated in the old system.

You may interpret US system is slavery or so. well, I think if a country needs someone for a temporary assignment for few year then it would be too generous for them to issue him permanant residency. Specially when he wasn´t promised to issue that. Did US Govt. promise to anybody while issuing H-1 that they would give him GC? I know some Indians/Chinese have no hope for GC, other than that if you can continue the work in the USA there is no other big reason to be deprived of GC, waiting time may be longer. If don´t like the waiting, then the door is opened, US Govt. didn´t promise you anyting, you came on your own. I´m currently personally victim of this strict US immigration system, but I STILL SUPPORT THAT. Because of this stringent policy I always have my market demand. Employers have to chase after me, unlike Canada. Why would I want thousand people of my professionals around me? I would only ignore if know that they wouldn´t compete with me. But in the US, they´ll always compete with me.

Canadian sol´n doesn´t need any rocket scientist. You also gave that. Make a pool of needed professionals on the basis of teh local market survey, also take the opinion of the employers if they´ll accept someone for X country with Y degree. Make a list of eligible school near/close to Canadian standard...give them more points...Mostly needed is a honest and unbiased policy.

[31-10-2007,17:17]
[***.254.208.242]
Departed_Canadian
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
DC,

I am also a victim of the strict US immigration system but I don´t support this. I agree with what you said, you come to US on your own with your job and yes you know it is temporary ....

..being on H1-visa is SLAVERY there are so many things I am not allowed to do just because I have a H1 not talking about my spouse with H4 visa who is like being a slave in a golden cage. US uses foreigners and they kick them when they don´t need them anymore. In my cases I have been moving every 2 years because of that H1 system and cannot get a GC .... and right now I occupy a position just for the sake of keeping my visa and stay in USA while my PR is under process .... I never thought I would do this in my life I am so so so so stuck here!

and worse I know so many other cases who people are being slaved and stuck to their work waiting for a green card, what kind of system is this ?

Actually I´d better stop here because all my frustration and anger will come out if I continue ... don´t want to insist on that and spread all this to educated and smart people like you guys.



[31-10-2007,18:31]
[**.122.79.108]
CBV333
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
CBV,

While writing the previous post I knew you would write me this. Anotehr day you wrote similar thing but I decided not to write anything as I realize your agony being not having the chance of getting GC.

My explanation though would sound cruel, but rational. First, if I go to any country I´ve to obey their law, not the reverse. I would be more than happy to slam US Govt./system if at the time of your H-1 approval they would promise you to issue GC within some years. Did they do that? No way the did. US Govt. never ever advertises anywhere to come into USA, Work here.. get the GC. Do they? You came into US on your own. So blaming them for not getting GC is not fair.

I´m personally not in that bad shape. For my nationality, even in EB3 it takes only 2-3 years for the full process. As far as I know unless you are chinese/Indian/Phili/Mexican then the story is all the same. Slave system or what ever, that H-1 is still the no.1 desired work visa in the class. Millions of high skilled most talented guys in the world are eager to accept that slavery. So when they don´t need kick...is not generalized. I don´t know any stat about unsuccessful GC applicants from H-1, but sure shouldn´t be that high.

Same thing for your wife, my wife. My wife also can´t work. But should I blame US for that? Why would I think that they´ll change the law for me? I came into their country by knowing accepting that fact, so no whinning. If do not like, then the door is open. She is goign to school here, paying in state. She at least got that. In Canada she even didn´t get admission in the school. Once she gets out her job is also secured.

Anyway, I don´t want to irrate you anymore. Forget about your mishap in US and start a happy life in Canada and be successful, I frankly hope.

[31-10-2007,18:47]
[***.254.208.242]
Departed_Canadian
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
Just to jump in. I agree with CBV in many ways. Although I think CBV would stay in the U.S. with acquisition of GC (correct me if I´m wrong).

The U.S. is not nearly as fair and open to new immigrants as Canada. In addition, there´s currently a strong anti-immigrant sentiment going on in the U.S. Even though it´s supposedly intended against illegals, it actually translates to negativity against all immigrants. This I don´t like, and is one of many reasons why I prefer Canada.

If all we talk about is jobs, making money, careers, etc., well the yes, maybe the U.S. is better. But isn´t there more to life than money, greed, power, and the corporate ladder? What about principles?

Do you guys who like the U.S. so much look the other way at the inequalities all around you? Do you just turn your head when there´s killing every day in Iraq and soon Iran? Your labor there fuels this kind of economy and foreign policy. Ok, call me an idiot and naive, but I believe there´s this thing called personal integrity that´s part of the decision as to where one chooses to live.

[31-10-2007,19:03]
[**.53.225.148]
Richard
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
Richard,

I think there will be some surprise waiting for you in Canada when you´ll start staying there as a resident.

I´m a very ordinary person, to me the first priority is making end meal, ie, job. So, I agree 1000% with you on US foreign policy, but as you said as a ordinary person I´m greedy. I can´t accpet the life of continuing under job being fully qualified, if you consider this as greed then I´m greedy.

In the bigger judgement of morality, except countries like Iraq, Afgan, Somalia none of us were in life threatening situation. Our poor country edcucated us with mostly their own expense (you probably don´t know in our or many other countries University education is free by the Govt.). What did we do in return? We are selling ourselves in the western world. Even some of this nations can be convivted for colonization and sucking us for few hundred years. So, question of moral? I sold that when I decided to migrate, US/Canada, UK what ever.

Any immigrants chose country of choice gave 90% emphasis on career, not value. Unfortunate but true.

[31-10-2007,19:14]
[***.254.208.242]
Departed_Canadian
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
Richard,
I agree with DC. If a person (and their spouse and family) are struggling to make ends meet, I don´t think they would be interested in your lecture about morals anyway. Maybe if you are at the retirement age.... morever, asking skilled workers to not think about job.... hmmmm ... interesting.

CBV,
I have a few friends who are/were in the same boat as you are, surprisingly enough most of them chose to return to their home country rather than move to Canada. A couple of them did go to Canada, but now they are back in the US.

Hey, we can listen to all the lectures that you can think of, what happens on the field is what matters. Don´t buy the stock that your broker advices you to buy, buy the one that he buys, anyone can preach, but when it comes to putting your money, thats when reality comes out.

[31-10-2007,19:39]
[**.112.73.220]
Raj
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
DC, Richard, Raj

Even if I had the GC I would not stay in US even if you would pay me for this .... theoretically I can get a GC if I apply for it but I won´t!

Interestingly what happened to DC in Canada is what is happening to me in US, it is very interesting to see how personal situations can change from one to another.

Immigrating to Canada for me has nothing to do with my career I guess I am one of the 10% ...

[31-10-2007,19:56]
[**.122.79.108]
CBV333
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
if you come to Canada with a work permit you can apply for permanent residency the day you arrive (1 year rule applies). Eventually, you get your turn and you have your PR. 99% guaranteed. Obviously that is not the case on an H1.

You do not need to be retired to have principles or values that embrace more than earnings. I am not suggesting that the US has nothing to offer - that would be foolishness but living next door really takes the shine off the prize.

DC- how long did you live in Canada before you gave up? Was a GC your ultimate goal?


[31-10-2007,19:56]
[***.20.127.20]
sharon
(in reply to: I LMAO too! #3)
Sharon,
Even in the US if you have applied for PR and one year has elapsed, you can stay back, but the question is not that, in the time one waits before one gets PR, one is gainfully employed and not wasting time and money on getting unnecessary certifications or doing odd jobs to make ends meet, you will understand this situation better if you go through it. Things are great for the case of the guy who is in Canada on a work permit, I have no problem there, and I am not comparing the two, and I cannot as I believe the percentage of SW immigration applicants who are on work permit should be negligible in canada.
Talk about principles, if you see the bigger picture you will be surprised that it all comes back to how well to do you are. It not surprising why crime is more in areas where the general population is struggling financially. You are living in a ideal world Sharon, and the principles that you talk about are already in the books on the shelfs in bookstores and libraries.

[31-10-2007,20:16]
[**.112.73.220]
Raj