permanent resident card

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Subject: permanent resident card
  hi every one i ws married a canadian citizen we was living in canada since i born my child he took me out of the country and divorce me and win a judge decision of this forein country to do not alowed to travel permission for my child and i try to travel back to canada to renew my permanent resident card is that possible to renew it i was n t in canada for three years and six months and i don t met the physical presences so do the immigrant officers will consider my case as a humanitarian case and what about divorce does it affest my immigration process (my ex husband is my sponsor)
thanks

[06-04-2008,02:38]
[**.196.210.84]
martha
(in reply to: permanent resident card)
Martha, I am sorry you had to go through such bad experience...

I hope one of the experts in this forum read your post and gives you some advice...

I think your child is and will continue to be a Canadian citizen... but in your case, I think you are right to think that you lost your PR status... I am not sure how you can overturn this situation... but my advice to you would be to find a GOOD immigration attorney who can help you and who you can trust to give you good advice...

Good Luck...

[06-04-2008,06:00]
[***.42.2.27]
Anonymous
permanent resident card (in reply to: permanent resident card)
thanks a lot for your reply and hope to read more advices please i have only 4 month until my card expiring date ,i ll be waiting for any reply
[06-04-2008,09:35]
[**.196.56.37]
martha
(in reply to: permanent resident card)
Were you abroad accompanying a Canadian citizen? If you were, then that time can be counted towards meeting residency obligation.
[06-04-2008,13:56]
[***.21.154.108]
Samm
(in reply to: permanent resident card)
Residency obligation

You must meet the residency obligation to obtain a Permanent Resident Card. If you have been a permanent resident for five years or more: you must have been physically present in Canada for a minimum of 730 days within the past five years. If you have been a permanent resident for less than five years: you must show that you will be able to meet the minimum 730 days in Canada at the five-year mark.

You may also count the days you spent outside of Canada in the following circumstances as days for which you satisfy the residency obligation:

OPTION 1. Accompanying a Canadian citizen outside Canada

You may count each day you accompanied a Canadian citizen outside Canada provided that the person you accompanied is your spouse, common-law partner or parent (if you are a child under 22 years of age).

OPTION 2. Employment outside Canada

You may count each day you worked outside Canada provided that your employment meets the following criteria. You are an employee of, or under contract to, a Canadian business or the public service of Canada or of a province, and are assigned on a full-time basis to:

a position outside Canada;
an affiliated enterprise outside Canada; or
a client of the Canadian business or the public service outside Canada.

For the purposes of this application, a Canadian business is defined as:

a corporation that is incorporated under the laws of Canada or of a province and that has an ongoing operation in Canada; or
an enterprise that has an ongoing operation in Canada and is capable of generating revenue and is carried out in anticipation of profit, and in which a majority of voting or ownership interests is held by Canadian citizens, permanent residents, or Canadian businesses as defined above; or
an organization or enterprise created by the laws of Canada or a province.

OPTION 3. Accompanying a permanent resident outside Canada

You may count each day you accompanied a permanent resident outside Canada provided that:

the person you accompanied is your spouse, common-law partner or parent (if you are a child under 22 years of age); and he or she was in compliance with his or her own residency obligation.

OPTION 4. Absence while in possession of a valid Returning Resident Permit.

You may count each day you spent outside of Canada with a valid Returning Resident Permit.


Humanitarian and Compassionate Grounds

If you are unable to meet the residency obligation, we will consider any compelling humanitarian and compassionate factors in your individual circumstances that may justify the retention of permanent resident status. We will notify you if this additional assessment is required.

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/information/applications/guides/5445EA.asp

[06-04-2008,15:59]
[**.58.78.47]
Edu
permanent resident card (in reply to: permanent resident card)
thanks a lot for every one(samm,edu)i do live with my child he is 4 years old and he is canadian,is that ok?and before that i was living with my ex husband and he is canadian ,so they will accept my status and accept to renew my p r card or they will refuse ? and about being divorced is that going to make me lose my permanent resident status (my ex husband was my sponser)thanks a lot,waiting for reply
[08-04-2008,15:56]
[**.201.197.149]
martha
prc (in reply to: permanent resident card)
hi every one i just need tounderstand do i have to be with a canadian citizen as a spouse or he can be a son
[18-04-2008,18:24]
[**.196.151.127]
martha
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