No Canada

Canada Immigration Forum (discussion group)


 
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Subject: No Canada
Do not even bother coming to this racist money-grab country.
[29-10-2009,03:37]
[**.157.173.229]
Carrie
(in reply to: No Canada)



I know the frustration you feel and the disappointmnet you are facing.

Although I succeeded to secure a job and establish my life in Canada, I agree with you that there is racism in this country which can or cannot be obvious but it does exist and anyone can be the vitcim. It´s also true that it is a money-grabing country. Costs of things are unreasonably high..The money you struggle to collect and save can disappear and vanish fast...What makes life worse is the weather. The gloomy weather in the country cannot be underestimated.

People might say that we are just complaining or we look at the negative things and ignore the positive ones...In fact, this is the truth that is based on exepriences of a significant number of immigrants (not necessary the failers but also the successful ones)...

However, you can always leave and go back if you don´t like it. No one can force you to stay and suffer..Unfortunately, the majority can not go back despite the suffering because the misery of their countries that drove them to immigrate surpass the suffering here!!!!!!! Therefore, they just go on their lives and hope their situation will improve...

People who intend to immigrate should be aware about these things. Regretfully, people do not believe it until they come and see it, only when it is too late ....this is very important to know especially for those who "cry" because of their application processing long times or those who pay thousands of dollars for the money-suckers (immigration lawyers)..They waste a long waiting time or drain large amounts of their savings just to be shocked when they arrive....very sad.

My advice: If desparate in your country, come here.If you are in a decent situation or in a better country (like the United States), do not come. Your situation will NOT be better. Be cautious and do not exaggerate in your optimism. Come here tmporarily and do not leave your job before you give up everything in your country.

[29-10-2009,06:18]
[**.80.235.13]
Anonymous
(in reply to: No Canada)
Hi ..this situation scares me to the hilt. We were migrating to canada thinking of a better life for us even though we had an option of migrating to UK ( we have a valid tier 1/ HSMP visa )...need more people to tell us how is life in all in canada. We are Human Resource and Finance Professionals migrating from India
[29-10-2009,06:45]
[***.27.235.5]
Anonymous
(in reply to: No Canada)
[Quote]
People who intend to immigrate should be aware about these things. Regretfully, people do not believe it until they come and see it, only when it is too late ....this is very important to know especially for those who "cry" because of their application processing long times or those who pay thousands of dollars for the money-suckers (immigration lawyers)..They waste a long waiting time or drain large amounts of their savings just to be shocked when they arrive....very sad.
[/Quote]
I wholeheartedly agree with you on this statement. This country immigration system is screaming for reform considering the fact that it takes forever to finalize an application. They like to use background security check as a scapegoat for this but I can´t imagine why this should be the case. I mean what else can they do other than asking character clearance certificate or calling local police station for information or search their database for bad record. If they do have other things check, such as employment records, it can be done with few phone calls. There is no excuse for this. And when applicants finally manage to pass this stage and get the approval, they´ll be shocked to know that how low the acceptable rate of foreign degrees can be here. It´s truly sad.

[29-10-2009,07:45]
[**.51.249.136]
Anonymous
(in reply to: No Canada)
[Quote]
Hi ..this situation scares me to the hilt. We were migrating to canada thinking of a better life for us even though we had an option of migrating to UK ( we have a valid tier 1/ HSMP visa )...need more people to tell us how is life in all in canada. We are Human Resource and Finance Professionals migrating from India
[/Quote]
I have yet to find out on UK but, oppose to your move, I´m thinking about moving to UK. What I´ve heard so far, they don´t take that long to process your application and easy to get job. Health care is also pay through tax just like in canada. If there is no huge downside, I probably take a move.

[29-10-2009,07:59]
[**.51.249.136]
Anonymous
(in reply to: No Canada)
there is no perfect place. Weather wise, job wise, community wise etc. 10 people can debate which place is better and you will get 10 different answers with 10 different reasons.

Racism occurs in EVERY country just in various degrees. Canada is full of immigrants who bring their prejudice with them. We would prefer they left their attitudes at home but that is not a requirement of immigration.

Immigration is a huge decision. Being realistic about what you hope to find is the first step to success. Yes, it rains here. Yes, the job market is not always what it is thought to be... yes, it is relatively expensive to live here, and yes... there are people who live here that are intolerant.

Plan accordingly.

[29-10-2009,12:12]
[***.5.54.139]
Sharon
(in reply to: No Canada)
Anonymous
**80,235,13**
Very well sayed ...

Tanto di capello


[29-10-2009,13:15]
[***.236.128.61]
stavrimacoku
(in reply to: No Canada)
All seem to be fine except that, I do not agree with the part where the feller sayz the immigration attys grab monies; this is a load of crock and not true at all... compare the prices you would pay a US or British lawyer!
[29-10-2009,16:24]
[***.202.38.241]
costs
(in reply to: No Canada)
The high prices of everything in Canada (compared to the States) is troubling and off-putting. And with lower average salaries, it´s apparent why many Canadians live paycheck to paycheck. To make things worse, too many people are chasing too few professional jobs, and Canadian businesses tend to hire native Canadians first. This causes the situation to look even gloomier for immigrants.

But there are 2 sides to every coin. For those immigrants who do find a decent position but later run into hard times, the fear of a fall without a safety net is much less, especially compared to the States. There, bankruptcy due to unaffordable medical bills is common, wiping out life savings and home foreclosures. People stay in miserable jobs for years and even decades because they can´t get health insurance coverage for their families outside their employer. There is no "Service Canada" equivalent in the States, where if you´re thrown out of your job you´re pretty much on your own (and possibly on the street) with no medical.

So, a new life in Canada for an immigrant is probably not going to be easy street. But at least it´s a system that has quite a lot more compassion and community/social support than most other countries in the world. If you become sick, you´ll be well taken care of at no charge. That´s a basic start and one less major worry that most other places won´t provide new immigrants. I think that´s quite generous, and something many of us here tend to forget.


[29-10-2009,19:42]
[**.192.28.31]
Richard
(in reply to: No Canada)
Richard, I think you are partially right about medicare. True, in essence, everyone has basic coverage and of course that is something every country should strive for, but plenty of Canadians do go bankrupt every year due to health costs not covered by the government. Each province determines what services and drugs it will cover, and if you are denied there is no recourse. It´s an unfortunate and inconvenient truth in the private-vs-public health care debate.

Coverage and accessibility are largely enhanced or possible only if you have a GP. True, for emergencies you can go to the ER or a clinic, just as you can in the States, but day to day care--real care, the preventative stuff and the daily concerns--really must be handled by a GP. Depending on the province you settle in, you may wait literally years for a doctor to call your own (for those who want to say to me: "Well, yes, but you live in poverty stricken New Brunswick for heaven´s sake, what do you expect!" I have to reply that NB has the second highest doctor per capita rating in the country with 80% of the population having a family doctor, and still I´m on a many-years long wait list with honestly no end in sight. I have friends here who live in fear of losing their GPs several provinces away because they know they will never get one locally).

I am not dissing one system or praising the other, but having lived with both I think it´s fair to say that they both have major issues. I wouldn´t base my decision on whether or not to immigrate over health care, however, and if I had the opportunity to do it all over, I would take an even more honest look that I did at the realities of an underfunded and overtaxed government based system. Canada has the right idea no doubt, but all good ideas need to be reassessed from time to time to make sure they still work. Thank goodness the US is finally doing just that (trying to make it work) and I hope that Canada can do the same sooner than later.

Richard, I´m not sure what you have in mind when you speak of the "safety net". Other than medicare, I´m not sure Canada offers any more job-search services or other support than the US does. Is there something specific you have in mind when you think of the "social/community support system"?

[30-10-2009,13:18]
[**.252.115.196]
wannabecanadian
(in reply to: No Canada)
Wannabe- I respect your views since you´ve really experienced both systems longer than me. You have a really good perspective.

But in my year up there, I was pleased with the health services received. Granted, in my part of wild and rural Ontario, a GP was also difficult if not impossible to find. It was walk-in services, as needed, which were always good to excellent. The important thing was that I didn´t feel beholden or enslaved to an employer for my medical and health coverage. I have to tell you it gave us a tremendous sense of relief.

I question that the number of Canadian medical-related bankruptcies comes anywhere near the per capita number of bankruptcies in the States. Did you see or hear about the movie "Sicko"? I wonder if you think Michael Moore is wrong, lying, or has an ulterior agenda about the expensive and selective system down here.

Yes, reform looks like it may finally happen here, with a good chance of a public option if the Republican-sponsored health insurance machine doesn´t manage to kill it. But in the meantime, I wonder if both of you somehow became unemployed, which country would you choose? I can´t believe you´d say down here - with the financial and health coverage uncertainties for the entire family to deal with and worry about.

I occasionally see posts here from Americans asking how to get residence status up there, with the sole reason that they can no longer afford health coverage or are out of work. Sure there are pluses and minuses to both systems. But to provide coverage as a human right at minimal or no cost has got to be a huge advantage over a for-profit system that looks for ways to kick you out and deny services based preexisting conditions, past history, and various whims.

My taking taking the last slot of this thread may be a bit unfair, I know. So it seems the final word on this subject may rest with me!



[30-10-2009,22:22]
[**.192.28.31]
Richard



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