truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!

Canada Immigration Forum (discussion group)


 
visaplace.com            
Subject: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!
  HI EVERYONE

I HAVE BEEN TO CANADA JUST A WEEK AGO.NOW I AM PLANNING TO GET A JOB.BUT
I HAVE SEEN HERE IN TORONTO,THAT MANY PUNJABI(indian) GUYS ARE EARNING VERY MUCH IN TRUCK DRIVING.SO I AM ALSO PLANNING TO GET A TRUCK LICENSE.
BUT I HAVE ONE QUESTION TO EVERYONE HERE,THAT HOW MUCH A TRUCK DRIVER CAN EARN IN A YEAR?MEANS AVVERAGE INCOME OF A TRUCK DRIVER IN NORTH AMERICA?
ALL THOUGHTS WILL BE APPRECIATED.
THANK YOU.

Depinder

[20-08-2005,10:36]
[***.134.194.73]
Depinder
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
In the us it can be as high as USD 60K but you will be on the road for 25 days in a month.
[20-08-2005,12:09]
[**.226.91.113]
sam
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
too lonely and dangerous, not reward for your family
[20-08-2005,14:13]
[**.66.36.59]
departure bay
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
DB...what do you know about this industry? People hear respect you and assume you are knowledgable. You have so much to offer this forum. Please keep your comments to subjects you know more about.

Trucking can be long haul and short haul. Local trucking can be very lucrative, particularly in port cities with container ship traffic. You can either be an employee of a trucking company or invest some cash in a rig and be an independant contractor.

You can also look at driving rig for road construction companies. Big machinery operators are well paid.

60-100K is possible.



[20-08-2005,14:49]
[***.20.170.23]
sharon
Amazing!!!!!!!!! (in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
If that is the amount of money truck drivers and other heavy machine operators make, then how much money other good office jobs offer?

Is it difficult to become eligible as truck driver or heavy machine operators? if yes, do let me know the requirements and i would be happy to switch to it from my current field of banking. Thanks

[20-08-2005,17:53]
[***.163.121.115]
Salman K Jan
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)

Yup, it´s funny how some trades pay more than white collar jobs. In D>C auto mechanics earn over USD 100K. That´s more than the avg starting salary at harvard Business school.

[20-08-2005,18:10]
[**.226.91.113]
sam
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
receptionist, $36-42,000 level 3 accountant... $48ish. That is why I laugh at so many of our PR applicants that turn up their noses at skilled labour jobs.

[21-08-2005,00:59]
[***.20.170.23]
sharon
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
If one has to go by the information posted on this forum, we can safely presume that for a family of 3, the salary of $3k (before tax) per month should suffice. Am i right in my assumption?

Secondly, as most people say that its better to start working in smaller cities first, as chances of being better assimilated/integrated in the society for immigrants are more, as compared to relatively larger cities (already having immigrants in abundance) Calgary might be exception to this rule; but only time will tell. If the above stated rationale is largely true; then are Truck driving and other heavy machine operator jobs available in smaller cities as well, or are they available in major economic activity cities? Thanks

[21-08-2005,05:47]
[***.163.121.115]
Salman K Jan
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
Heavy machinery operators are in more demand in the smaller cities where much of the economics rely on logging. (speaking of B.C. in particular).

However getting a job as a machine operator is more difficult than getting a job as a Truck driver. Without any prior experience operating machinery it will cost your employer alot to train you (in damage, wear and lost production).

All a truck driver needs to do is get the appropriate licenses and they are qualified, for highway driving.

Equipment operators in the city usually get to see their families every day but typically make a lot less than remote location equipment operators. The upside of working in a remote location is that you make more money but typically it´s shift work 10 days on 4 days off (not good for a family man).

By remote location I mean northern B.C. (north of Prince George)

In some ways DB is correct truck driving very often is a high hour low family contact job. (I was born in canada and grew up around Prince George. My family owns a logging/road building company so I have a pretty good idea of what I´m talking about)

I can´t say anything about hauling in a port city, but generally there is a lot more competition for jobs.

There are many different options in canada for skilled/ manual labour that make a lot of money.

Northern Alberta has oil riggs, if you are physically strong, a good worker and reliable you can make LOTS of money working on the oil rigs.

Northern BC has Logging, If you get an industrial first aid ticket ( level 1 I think but can´t remember) it can help you get on with a logging outfit.

Much depends on where you want to live, in western provinces it isn´t hard to find a well paying job if your a good worker.

The amount of money you need a month is way to subjective for anyone to really give you an answer, I think a family of 3 could survive of $3K no problem. But it all depends on your lifestyle and location. Do you need a new car, or are you happy with an old junker? Do you need brand-name goods or are you a 2nd hand shopper?

One major benefit of the smaller cities is the lower cost of housing ( unless you want to live on the coast where cheap housing is hard to come by).

If manual labour isn´t beneath your level you can find work in any city or town in canada. There is no shortage work in canada. You may not be able to get a job in your current field, or a field related to your education, but you can definitely find work. I see many instances where people won´t take manual labour because they hold onto the perception ( from their home countries) that manual labourers are second class. Well in canada that isn´t the case.

Keep an open mind and take whatever jobs you need to until you have some some experience and settle in canada. By then you´ll have made contacts/friends in the community and you´ll be in a much better position. By that time you may be able to find a job related to your education.

Shawn

[21-08-2005,10:51]
[**.10.168.76]
Shawn
Thanks a zillion! Shawn (in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
Wonderfully detailed message. Thanks Shawn.

To be honest my strategy is as follows;

1. Land into Canada (Regina or Edmonton) and start any ordinary job (i have some contacts in Regina and Edmonton) which could offer me $3k per month. my wife has teaching experience, she intends to do part time job and initial vibes suggest that she would get around $1k-$1.5K per month.
2. Get an apartment at around $700 per month (boardwalk properties are reasonable, at least it looks so)
3. Get our son admitted to a local reasonable school in grade 1.
4. Get driving license (i have started practising on left hand drive car in Pakistan) and buy a used good car in the range of $8k-$10k. I m not sure if leasing companies offer leasing options on older cars like 1997-1998 models?
5. Based on above four points......start a new life, get into the grove and get settled in Canada physically, socially, mentally, cultrally.
6. Keep on looking for better jobs in and around same areas more specifically and do small courses/certification like Certified Project Management Consultant or Process Improvement etc.
7. Use my contacts (which i might have accumulated by now), education, experience in Canada, alongside my newly acquired certification and move to a better paying job.
8. Try to get into Haskayne School Univ of Calgary or Sauder School - Univ of BC...This is medium term goal....3-4 years after landing. Obtain MBA degree and then move ahead in life.
9. Hopefully, above situations as explained in 8 points would come all in good time.
Thanks for guidance and i hope I could get benefit of your valuable advices on regular basis, if suitable and appropriate may I ask for your email address.

Just in case you want to send any other relevant information please do so at my email address; salmankjan@yahoo.com.

Profound regards and deep appreciation, Salman

[21-08-2005,16:56]
[***.163.121.115]
Salman K Jan
(in reply to: truck driving in canada !!!!!!!!!!)
sounds like a great strategy. I vote for Edmonton. Also consider the MBA program at Simon Fraser University. My friend just finished it as a part time student so he could continue working a slightly reduced week. (helped with the cash flow). The school has an excellent reputation. If you find the right job and prove your worth, some employers will help pay for the courses.
[21-08-2005,17:43]
[***.20.170.23]
sharon