Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2

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Subject: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2
sure, the average wage of a psychologist might be 80.. for a doctor of psychology. Why dont you try to compare the wages of undergrad psyc with undergrad eng, that way it is a level playing field.

Anyone with an undergrad degree can go to law or medical schools, engineers included. The reason why more students pick psyc over engineering is because they are uneducated about the world outside of school. Post secondary education is sort of about doing what you love, but you have to think realisticly. Many students go and spend 60 thousand dollars of their parents money to get a degree that earns then like $30,000 a year when they get out. How responsable is that? Anyone who takes responsability for their own education will agree with me when i say that money should be a large factor in deciding your schooling.


Try spending 60,000 at school and trying to support yourself and pay back your student loans by earning $30,000/yr as a psyc grad. You wont even be able to pay the interest on $60,000.

[08-08-2006,21:07]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: Psychologists v.s. Engineers)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sorry i overestimated you guys, its more like 28K per year. Psyc does not give graduates enough bang for their buck to make it worth it, well in my opinion.

Program: engineering vs Psychology
Earnings: $52,000 VS $28,000
Degree Cost: $60,000 VS $60,000

http://money.cnn.com/2004/09/21/pf/college/starting_salaries/



[08-08-2006,21:27]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
How is it fair to compare the salaries of someone with undergrad psych and undergrad engineering? An undergraduate degree in engineering is a professional degree - it?s hardly fair. To be clear, an undergrad engineering degree is a professional degree in exactly the same way that a M.D. is an undergraduate degree in medicine and a LLB is an undergraduate degree in law except both medicine and law require students complete at least a few years of University first. So, it?s hardly a fair comparison. An undergrad in psychology is meant as a stepping stone unto either professional school (medicine, law, business) or graduate school (psychology, whatever). It, like any other science degree is completely useless without a PhD.

As for the reason why students choose psychology or any other field aside from engineering, would it be so crazy as to speculate that students choose psychology or any other field because they actually enjoy it!? To say that those who choose to study a field other than engineering in University are uneducated is absolutely ridiculous! You are the one who is uneducated! I was under the impression that University is a place to receive an education and not just a degree. But, I think I know where you are coming from. You are probably coming from a poorer family and you are trying to make a better life for yourself, so you are looking for a sooner pay out? I, on the otherhand, come from a pretty wealthy family and I am supported by my parents to study whatever I am interested in. They know that my education is not limited to the undergraduate level, and money is not a big big issue.

[08-08-2006,21:38]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
Applied Psychology - Industrial/Organizational

This section presents the salaries of those respondents whose positions may be called applied psychology (e.g., personnel selection, assessment, systems or equipment design, organizational consultation, analysis or training) and whose current major field is industrial/organizational psychology. Salaries for the 176 doctoral-level respondents are described in Figure 10 and Table 10.

Of the doctoral-level respondents in this category, the largest proportions were employed in consulting firms (38%) followed by business and industry settings (33%). Six percent were self-employed, 5% were employed in a government agency, and 4% worked as independent consultants.

The overall median 11-12-month salary for doctoral-level industrial/organizational psychologists in 2003 was $105,000, based on 169 valid responses. The standard deviation ($76,630) is large for this group, indicating substantial variation around the mean of $130,059. Salaries of doctoral-level industrial/organizational psychologists are also examined by degree, age, gender, and salary change across years in the salary report by the Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychologists (SIOP) entitled, 2003 Income and Employment Survey Results For The Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology (Medsker, Katkowski, and Furr, 2005).

http://research.apa.org/03salary/homepage.html#applied_io

[08-08-2006,21:39]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
The main thing is that you are comparing a PROFESSIONAL degree to an undergraduate degree that is useless without a PhD.

Engineers are expected to go out and work after undergrad, whearas an science undergrad is expected to go to either professional (med or law school) or graduate school (for their PhD).

This isn´t rocket science, man.

[08-08-2006,21:42]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
your mother would like you to study engineering although she knows you are a bum and couldn´t register in anything else except psycho, your mama would like to be proud of you but you disappointed her, you know that. i would be soooooo embarassed to tell anyone i am studying psyho.
[08-08-2006,21:47]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
engineers rock!
[08-08-2006,21:50]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
YOu people are sickening.

Just shut up and get summer jobs you lazy bums.

hahaha

[08-08-2006,21:51]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
Engineers don´t know how to debate.
[08-08-2006,21:58]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
Well actually the "D" in MD, stands for doctor, an MD is not an undergraduate(bach degree, its a post graduate doctoral degree. Law is an iffy one because you dont always need a full degree to pursue it, although most law students do anyway. Most people i know would consider law more of a post graduate degree more equivalent to a masters than anything. The money lawyers make more closly resembles an engineers salary then that of a doctor anyway.


Anyways..You seem to know what your doing, post graduate studies is a great idea and increases earning power. The problem is that the majority of students never go on to post graduate studies. I think that most people who quit after their undergrad with a psyc degree are not thinking responsably, and not thinking ahead.

[08-08-2006,22:02]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
one more thing,man i doubt alot of you guys are even engineering students.. anyone who talks like that must still be in highschool
[08-08-2006,22:05]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
http://www.ee.ryerson.ca/
[08-08-2006,22:35]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
my family isnt poor, my dad makes 130K/yr as an engineer and my mom makes about 30K/yr as an educational assistant.

My parents dont pay any of my education because they want me to make it on my own, my dad never got a cent from his parents and it shaped his work ethic and appresiation for things far beyond what it would have been otherwise. In my opinion there is nothing wrong with accepting help from someone... but some students out there make me sick, there are ALOT of students out there who have never written a check, who dont even know how much their own tuition costs

[08-08-2006,22:43]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
To the dummy engineering student,

The psychology guy is right: an MD is considered an undergraduate degree, NOT a doctoral degree.

http://www.facmed.utoronto.ca/English/Undergraduate-Medical-Program.html

[09-08-2006,00:17]
Anonymous
(in reply to: Salary War: psyc VS eng ...2)
Also, a LLB is also an undergraduate professional degree. On the other hand, a JD is a professional doctorate degree - meaning it requires the completion of a bachelors degree. While only UofT offers a JD in Canada, it is common place in the U.S.
[09-08-2006,00:27]
Anonymous



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